How to Make Your Living Room Wall More Attractive

How to Make Your Living Room Wall More Attractive

So, your living room is all set up now. The couch is in position. End tables are on point and gorgeous lamps adorn them. Even the ottoman you reupholstered is legit looking awesome.

But as you survey your handy work you quickly realise there’s a blank hole staring at you. The wall behind the sofa is looking pretty dull. Especially compared to the rest of the room. This article is designed to help you fill that void with properly aligned wall art. Learn how down below.

Consider Your Wall

There are multiple options you can explore with wall art. One simple, elegant piece can enhance a blank wall with effortless ease. Or if you are unable to find a solo piece you like, combine your favourite wall art! If it meshes well. That said, your collection of art can work in unison to create the perfect eye candy your living room needs.

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With your works of art in mind, the next step is to consider the distance from your floor to the ceiling. If this measurement is more than 2,5 metres (approx. 8 feet) wall art can typically be placed at eye level behind your sofa.

Unless, of course, you are way over 6 feet tall. Then go by the three portion rule.

To do so, picture your blank wall as three portions. The couch occupies the bottom third. And, as you may have guessed, the second portion is reserved for your art. That said, there is one exception to this logic, walls that are less than 8 feet.

If this is your scenario, opt to keep the bottom edge of the wall art at least 6 inches above the sofa.

Working With Small Wall Art

Designers using small works of art have to put in extra effort to embellish their wall. Nevertheless, when that additional bit of work is added the results can be quite astonishing.

The main rule of thumb here is to treat all of the pieces you want to use as one portion. To accomplish this, try to create a rectangle shape with your art collection if possible. Doing so will make it a bit easier to visualise where everything is supposed to go once everything’s up on the wall.

Using The Sofa as a Baseline

Picking out ideal artwork can be a bit challenging. Especially if you’ve found a bunch of really good contenders. A determining factor you can use to break any such ties is the sofa itself.

Ideally, the wall art you choose should be smaller than the length of your sofa. Or at least take up approximately that much space. Try to go for a piece that is somewhere between ½ and ⅔ of your sofa. And be sure to aim for dead centre as much as possible for optimal results.

Setting Up Multiple Pieces of Wall Art

As we mentioned above, maintaining a semi-rectangle shape makes hanging small wall art a bit easier. Especially when it comes to aiming for the dead centre of your sofa. Unfortunately, visualising how these works of art are supposed to go together can be tiring when aimlessly placing them on the wall.

So, to visually go about organising your art into a rectangle, place your multiple pieces on the floor. Preferably not in a walking path. Next, space each work of art about 3 inches away from each other. When you find a configuration you like, take measurements.

The idea here is to take note of the distance between where the nails are going to go. Compare that to the sofa measuring and placement tips we mentioned. If things are about right, you can then use your measurements to effortlessly transition the wall art from the floor to the wall.

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Go Big or Go Multi

Good interior design can include big wall art without being visually overbearing. The same can be said for small art pieces. However, solo pieces that are smaller than a ¼ the length of your sofa need companions. Otherwise, the look ends up being a bit awkward.

How Big is Too Big

If you have an interior design idea using art the same size as the wall, and it looks good, go for it. After all, the main goal is to pick art that matches the look and feel you are going for.

Adorning a blank wall with properly scaled art takes a bit of finesse. The piece in question should aptly complement your interior design idea without being overwhelming. Try to adhere to the rule of three portions when possible and aim for dead centre of your sofa, regardless of how many works of art you want to put on the wall.

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